Health & Safety Policy Statement Part 3

    Contents information Part 3
  • Working Documentation Appendices
  • Appendices Cover Sheet
  • Appendices Contents Page
    Generic Information & Guidance
  • Accident / Incident Reporting Procedures for Sites
  • Company Safety, Health & Environmental Induction Guidance
  • Core Semi-Generic Risk Assessment & Safety Controls for Method of Work
  • Generic PPE Assessment Guidance
  • Generic Safe Method of Work Statement
  • Health and Safety At Work Etc. Act 1974
  • Information Signs for Action to be taken in the event of a major or small fire
  • Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 - Notes
  • Risk Assessment Guidance Notes
  • Site Safety Induction Guidance
  • Scaffolding, Excavations, Cofferdams & Caissons Inspection Report Notes
  • Welding References
  • Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 - Notes
  • Working Time Directive – Explanation of Regulations
    Checklists
  • Asbestos Project Planning Checklist
  • Ladder / Stepladder Inspection Checklist
  • Management Teams Health & Safety Checklist for Sites
  • Personal Protective Equipment Assessment Checklist & Record of Instruction / Issue
  • Portable Electrical Equipment Pre-Use Visual Inspection Checklist
  • Project Safety & Health Management Plan Checklist Guidance
    Permits to Work
  • Abrasive Wheel – Hot Work – Permit to Work
  • Confined Spaces - Permit to Work
  • Electric Arc Welding – Hot Work – Permit to Work
  • Electrical Permit to Work
  • Gas Welding and Cutting – Hot Work – Permit to Work
  • Hot Works Permit
  • Machine Excavation Works – Permit to Dig
  • Temporary Works - Permit to Work
  • Work At Height Permit
    Registers
  • COSHH Assessment Register
  • Display Screen Equipment Assessment Register
  • Employees Health Record Register
  • Fire Drill Register
  • Fire Instruction Training / Induction Register
  • Health Surveillance Operatives Hand & Arm Vibration Register
  • Risk Assessment / Method Statement Controls Register (for Personnel who have been instructed on this information)
  • Safety T ool Box T alk Register
  • Site Safety Induction Register
  • Temporary Works Register
    Reports
  • Electrical Installations - Forms of Completion and Inspection Certificate
  • Internal Health & Safety Management System Core Audit
  • Project Health & Safety Management Audit
    Forms
  • Accident Record Form
  • COSHH Assessment - Blank Form and Guidance
  • Disciplinary Procedure Record Form
  • Display Screen Equipment (DSE) Workstation Assessment
  • Emergency Lighting T est Record Form
  • Employee Competence & Security Assessment Form
  • Environmental Monitoring / Inspection Record Form
  • Escape Routes Check Record Form
  • Fire Alarm System T est Record Form
  • Fire Doors Check Record Form
  • Fire Fighting Equipment Inspection Record Form
  • Fire Risk Assessment & Fire Control Arrangements - Blank Pro-forma
  • Hand / Arm Vibration Assessment Record Form
  • Health Surveillance Assessment Form for Site Personnel
  • Health Questionnaire for New Employees (Confidential)
  • Incident Report Form
  • Project Lifting Plan
  • Manual Handling Operations Assessment Form
  • Noise Assessment Record Form
  • Plant & Equipment Maintenance Record Form
  • Risk Assessment - Blank Pro-forma
  • Risk Assessment / Method Statement Appraisal Form
  • Safety Improvement Scheme & Workforce Consultation Form
  • Site Emergency Procedure Form
  • Fire Safety Plan
  • Work At Height Rescue Plan Form
    Mandatory Forms & Reports
  • Contractors Competency Safety Questionnaire – Stage 1 Initial Assessment
  • Contractors Competency Safety Questionnaire – Stage 2 Project Specific Assessment
  • Controlled Waste Transfer Notice Form
  • F10 Notification of Construction Project
  • F2508 Form for Reporting of an injury or dangerous occurrence
  • Fall Arrest Equipment Weekly Inspection Report Form
  • Inspection Report Form for Excavations, Cofferdams and Caissons
  • Inspection Report Form for Scaffolding
  • Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 – Report of Inspection – Section A
  • Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 – Report of Thorough Examination – Section B
  • Personal Protective Equipment Check Record
  • PPE Record Form for Client / Principal Contractor Project Requirements
  • Professional T eam Competence & Resource Questionnaire
  • Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 – Report of Inspection
  • Premises Fire Safety Assessment

Company Safety, Health & Environmental Induction Guidance Brith Services Limited
Name   Signature   Date  
General Note: No persons are allowed to work for the Company until they have received Company Safety Induction. A record should be kept of all persons who have received Induction. Induction to include the following:-
Company Health and Safety Policy:
Remind personnel of the Policy and its contents;
Inform personnel where a copy of the Policy is displayed.
Management Structure:
Outline Line Management for the Company.
Welfare and First Aid facilities:
Inform personnel where canteen and toilet facilities are located;
Ask personnel if they have any health issues that the Company should be aware of, or which may affect their work or their interaction with others;
Ensure personnel complete a Health Questionnaire;
Inform personnel where the First Aid facilities are located;
Inform personnel who are the Company First Aiders and appointed persons;
Remind personnel about good hygiene practices.
Personal Protective Equipment:
Advise personnel when and where it would be required to wear PPE;
PPE to be worn when using potentially hazardous substances;
PPE to be worn related to other risk factors and conditions.
Emergency Evacuation Procedures:
Outline the important factors of the Fire Plan for the Company premises, in particular:-
The fire alarm, how it sounds and how to raise the alarm;
Fire escapes;
Fire fighting equipment;
Fire Wardens;
Fire prevention.
General Company Safety Rules:
Outline any agreed Company safety rules;
Risk Assessment:
Outline Risk Assessments to Company personnel where necessary.
Method Statements:
Ensure that Company personnel understand Method Statements for their work.
Other Safety Information:
Ensure that personnel are provided with drawings, Manufacturers Safety Data, etc., where necessary.
Explain current and imminent works in progress, including any specific hazards and control measures.
Ensure personnel understand they should only use plant and equipment for which they have been properly instructed on.
Phasing and Scheduling of the works:
Ensure that all personnel understand the importance of the scheduling of works in relation to the safety of themselves and others who may be working in their working environment.
General Safety Precautions and Rules:
All personnel will sign in and out of the Company premises with security or make their presence known to Management.
All appropriate PPE must be worn as and when required.
General public safety will be maintained at all times.
Use the right tools and equipment for the job.
Plant and equipment to be kept in good order and not misused.
Report any safety defects to Management.
No smoking, no naked flames in areas at risk from fire and explosions.
Check the working environment for hazards before working.
Ensure instructions are fully understood before working.
Maintain personal hygiene.
Be aware of others safety - do not create hazards.
Always take precautions to prevent materials and tools etc., from falling.
Ensure that debris and rubbish does not accumulate unsafely.
Do not obstruct accessways unsafely.
Do not carry loads that cannot be managed comfortably to prevent the risk of injury.
Report all accidents and dangerous occurrences immediately to Management.
Company Environmental Policy & System:
Outline the Policy and Management System.

Health & Safety At Work Etc. Act 1974

Under the Act the Secretary of State is empowered to make Regulation for a number of purposes which are listed in a Schedule to the Act. The Health and Safety Commission which is now in being, may approve and issue Codes of Practice and although failure to observe such a code would not in itself be illegal, it may be referred to in criminal proceedings to show that the failure to comply with the code or any provision of it, constitutes a contravention of any particular requirement or prohibition of the Act. Note: Existing Acts, Orders and Regulations remain in force until such time as they may be modified or repealed, and existing Codes of Practice which may be considered as suitable for the purpose, will need to be formally 'approved' by the Commission before they can be used in the manner described.

Enforcement of the Act is now the responsibility of the Health and Safety Executive appointed by the Commission, with the proviso that responsibility may be transferred in certain cases to local authorities, e.g., fire precautions. Enforcement Officers will operate along the lines of the Factory Inspectors but will be armed with considerably more power. If an Inspector is of the opinion that a person is contravening a statutory provision or is likely to repeat a contravention, he may serve on that person an Improvement Notice', requiring specified remedial action to be taken within a specified time. If the Inspector considers that the contravention involves a risk of serious injury, he may serve on that person a 'Prohibition Notice', having immediate effect if considered necessary, directing that the specified activities must not be carried on until the specific matters have been remedied. If an Improvement Notice or Prohibition Notice is not complied with, persons responsible are liable to imprisonment for up to six months. Either of these Notices may (but need not), include directions as to the measures to be taken, except where a Notice has immediate effect it may be withdrawn by the Inspector before the date specified, or on the other hand, the period specified may be extended. An Inspector may seize any plant, article or substance he finds on any premises, if he considers it to be a cause of imminent danger.

An Inspector may give to persons employed (or their representatives), factual information obtained by him relating to the premises and anything done there and inform them of any action he is taking in connection with the premises.

A person found guilty of an offence under the Act is liable to a fine of up to £20,000.00 (for each offence) and on conviction or indictment for certain offences, up to two years imprisonment, or a fine, or both. Continuation of an offence for which a person has been convicted, constitutes a further offence and that person is liable to a fine of up to £100.00 for each day on which the contravention continues.

Non-compliance with certain specified parts of the Act or relevant statutory provisions can give rise to prosecution in a higher court as an indictable offence. In this case, conviction may lead to an unlimited fine. The Director, Manager, Secretary or other Senior Officers of a body corporate committing an offence may also be guilty of the offence. When an offence committed by one person is due to the acts or defaults of another, then that other person is guilty of the offence and may be charged and convicted.

An Appeal may be made to an Industrial Tribunal within the period specified in the Notice. The Tribunal may either cancel or affirm the Notice, or modify it as it thinks fit. An Appeal will automatically suspend an Improvement Notice until an Appeal is disposed of or withdrawn. A Prohibition Notice may be suspended on Appeal, but then only if the Tribunal directs it.

It is now imperative that the Safety Advisor be advised immediately if an Enforcement Officer visits any premises and that prompt action is taken to deal effectively with any faults or defects noted by him. If an 'Improvement Notice' is issued the matter referred to must be corrected within the period specified in the Notice or an Appeal *must be lodged. If a Prohibition Notice is issued, then the activities specified in the Notice must cease as directed irrespective of its effects on other activities.

The Company Safety Advisor must be informed of any complaints made by an Enforcement Officer and in the event of a Prohibition Notice being issued the Legal Department should be informed at once.

*See Form S1 1925. Industrial Tribunal's (Improvement and Prohibition Notices) Appeals Regulations 1974 - published by H.M. Stationary Office.

Action to be taken in the event of a
major fire

Do not attempt to deal with the fire
Vacate the danger area immediately towards a safe fire exit and shout out “Fire, Fire, Fire” continuously

Vacate the danger area immediately towards a safe fire exit and shout out “Fire, Fire, Fire” continuously

Sound the Fire Alarm
Go to a safe fire alarm point and sound the alarm so that all other persons who could be in danger are made aware of the fire

Inform the Foreman and Fire Wardens

Report to the Fire Assembly Point

Follow instructions issued by the Fire Marshall or the Fire Brigade

Do not return to the site until instructed to do so

Action to be taken in the event of a
small fire

You should only attempt to put out a fire providing you are at no risk of danger.

Shout out ‘Fire, Fire, Fire’ continuously to let others know the danger.

Providing you have been trained in the use of fire extinguishers, extinguish the fire using the appropriate extinguisher situated at a nearby fire point.

Ensure the Foreman or Fire Wardens are informed as soon as possible.

Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 - Notes

  1. Introduction: The Reports of Inspection and Thorough Examination have been formulated to record the information required for Inspections (Section A) and Thorough Examinations (Section B) carried out under The Lifting Operations & Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER).
  2. Thorough Examination and Inspection: The previous regime of testing, thorough examination and inspection has been replaced with new thorough examination and inspection requirements under LOLER.
  3. A thorough examination may include visual examination, a strip down of the equipment and functional tests. Advice should be sought from Manufacturers instructions and a competent person for guidance on what a thorough examination should include for each piece of equipment. Additional Inspections will be identified by the user of the equipment. Factors that must be taken into account by the user include the work being carried out, any specific risks on site that may affect the condition of the equipment and the intensity of the equipment.
  4. The level of competence will depend upon the type of equipment and the level of thorough examination or inspection required.
  5. A thorough examination must be carried out:
    1. When the equipment is put into service for the first time by you, unless:
    2. It is new equipment that has not been used before and you have received a declaration of conformity made not more than 12 months before lifting equipment is put into service.
    3. You have obtained the equipment from another undertaking and it is accompanied by a copy of the previous report of a thorough examination.
  6. Where safety depends upon the installation conditions to ensure that it has been installed correctly and it is safe to operate (Installed applies to lifting equipment erected or built on site such as tower cranes, hoists or gantry cranes. It would not apply to equipment such as a mobile crane that is not ‘installed’.
    1. After installation and before being put into service for the first time.
    2. After assembly and before being put into service at a new site or in a new location.
    3. Lifting equipment for lifting persons must be thoroughly examined at least every 6 months.
    4. Accessories for lifting (lifting gear) must be thoroughly examined at least every 6 months.
    5. All other lifting equipment must be thoroughly examined at least every 12 months.
    6. After exceptional circumstances liable to affect the safety of the lifting equipment (required even if an examination scheme is developed).
  7. You can follow these intervals laid down in the Regulations or there is an option for competent persons to develop an examination scheme for different pieces of plant.
  8. Inspection: An inspection may also be required at suitable intervals for certain types of lifting equipment. Unless indicated by the Manufacturer it will be appropriate to continue inspecting lifting equipment at weekly intervals. For the majority of lifting equipment the driver should be competent to carry out the regular inspection.
  9. Reports: The person carrying out the thorough examination must make out a report as soon as possible and the report must be in writing. The report can be contained in a register, attached to the equipment itself or stored electronically in a tamper proof form. It must be signed by the person carrying out the thorough examination (or someone on his behalf).
  10. For each thorough examination the person making out the report must provide the report to the user and to the person from whom the equipment has been hired or leased.
  11. For each inspection a report must be made in writing and provided to the user.
  12. Any defects noted during the thorough examination or inspection which could become a danger to persons must be notified to the user and the equipment must not be used until the defect is rectified.
  13. In the event of a defect being identified during a thorough examination involving an existing or imminent risk of serious injury, a copy of the report must be sent as soon as possible to the relevant enforcing authority. For the majority of construction activities this will be The Health & Safety Executive.
  14. Reports of thorough examinations and inspections should be kept available for inspection at the place where the lifting equipment is being used. If this is not possible, the information should be readily accessible. Reports must be readily available to the HSE or Local Authority Inspectors if required.
  15. No lifting equipment should leave any undertaking unless accompanied by physical evidence that the last thorough examination has been carried out.
  16. Reports of thorough examinations must be kept for the following:-
    1. A thorough examination for equipment first put into use by the user – until he no longer uses the lifting equipment (except for lifting accessory).
    2. A thorough examination for lifting accessories first put into use by the user – for two years after the report is made.
    3. All other thorough examination for equipment dependent upon the installation conditions – until the user no longer uses the lifting equipment at that place.
    4. All other thorough examinations – until the next report is made or for two years whichever is the longer. If you are following the intervals laid down in the Regulations, all thorough examination reports will need to be kept for two years from the date the last report was made.
  17. Reports of inspections must be kept available until the next report is made.

Risk Assessments - A Practical Guide

  1. Legal Requirements: The Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (MHSW Regs) implement the EC Framework Directive and require every employer to make a suitable and sufficient assessment of:-
    1. The risks to health & safety of his employees to which they are exposed whilst they are at work;
    2. The risks to health & safety of persons not in his employment arising out of or in connection with the conduct by him of his undertaking;
    3. For the purpose of identifying the measures he needs to take to comply with the requirements and prohibitions imposed upon him by or under the relevant statutory provisions;
    4. There is a similar requirement on self-employed persons;
    5. The MHSW Regulations also contain a range of other requirements, which are not addressed by this guidance. It is essential that employers comply with all parts of the Regulations;
    6. Risk Assessment is also explicit or implicit in certain other Regulations made under the Health and Safety at Work etc., Act. Reference is made to some of these later.
  2. Risk Assessment: A Risk Assessment may be defined as an identification of the hazards present in an undertaking and an estimate of the extent of the risks involved, taking into account whatever precautions are already being taken. It is essentially a three-stage process;
    1. Identification of all the hazards;
    2. Evaluation of the risks;
    3. Measures to control the risks.
  3. There are different approaches which can be adopted in the workplace, for example;
    1. Look at each activity which could cause injury;
    2. Look at hazards and risks in groups, e.g., machinery, transport, substances / materials, electrical etc;
    3. Look at each section / department, e.g., goods inwards, machine shops, laboratory, offices, warehouse etc.
  4. Whichever method is manageable for you is probably best. (N.B. do not forget non-routine activities, e.g., maintenance, breakdowns, etc.).
  5. In order to be suitable and sufficient and to comply with other legal requirements, a Risk Assessment must;
    1. Identify all the hazards associated with the operation and evaluate the risks arising from those hazards (taking account of relevant Acts and Regulations);
    2. Record the significant findings if more than five persons are employed (even if they are spread across two or more locations);
    3. Identify any group of employees (or single employees as the case may be) who are especially at risk;
    4. Identify others who may be specially at risk e.g., visitors, contractors, members of the public;
    5. Evaluate existing controls, stating whether or not they are satisfactory and if not, what action needs to be taken. This should include training and information provisions;
    6. Judge and record the probability or likelihood of an accident occurring as a result of uncontrolled risk. Also record the ‘worst case’ likely outcome;
    7. Record any circumstances arising from the assessment where serious and imminent danger could arise;
    8. Identify what information is needed for employees on the risks to their health and safety identified by the assessment, the precautions to be taken and any emergency arrangements;
    9. Provide an action plan giving information on implementation of additional controls, in order of priority and with a realistic timescale.
  6. The Risk Assessment is also required to be maintained. This means that significant change to a process or activity, any new process, activity or operation should be subject to Risk Assessment and that if new hazards come to light then these should also be subject to Risk Assessment. In addition, the Risk Assessment should be periodically reviewed and updated. The frequency of review depends upon the level of risk in the operation and should normally not exceed ten years. It may be found useful to carry out review of Risk Assessment as part of Safety Policy/Manual review as the two activities are closely linked.
    1. If a serious accident occurs in the organisation or elsewhere, but could happen in the organisation and where a check on the Risk Assessment shows no assessment or a gap in assessment procedures, then a review is necessary. Similarly, for unidentified areas resulting from Health & Safety monitoring at the workplace.
  7. Definitions of Hazard and Risk: The terms ‘hazard’ and ‘risk’ are frequently used in the Regulations, Approved Code of Practice and Guidance. It is important to appreciate what these terms mean.
    1. Hazard is the potential for harm;
    2. Risk is a function of the probability (or likelihood) of that harm actually occurring and the severity of its consequences;
    3. The extent of the risk should also take account of the number of people exposed to the harm.
    4. It should be carefully noted that this does not need quantified probability except for high risk activities where the outcome could be multiple fatalities.
  8. Hazard Identification: There are a number of simple ways in which hazards can be identified. In order to achieve a suitable and sufficient Risk Assessment, it is essential to identify all the hazards associated with the activity, therefore all the methods of identifying hazards will need to be assessed and the most suitable mix used.
    1. Before going to the next stage, a check needs to be made that all the hazards have been identified. In all cases team consultation is a powerful aid. This can involve an appropriate selection from line management and safety representatives.
    2. For complex activities it can be useful to break down the activity into its component parts, perhaps by job analysis. For example, at a large machine this could comprise:
      1. Normal operating;
      2. Breakdown;
      3. Cleaning / spillage;
      4. Lubricating;
      5. Setting / adjustment;
      6. Overhaul;
      7. Installation;
      8. Dismantling.
  9. Risk Assessment: For each activity a Risk Assessment then needs to be made. There are many techniques of Risk Assessment ranging from complex techniques such as fault tree analysis and reliability studies to simple subjective judgement.
    1. In simple terms, if there is a risk of a single event/fault killing many people, then a complex assessment method is justified. On the other hand, if the worst case is a single fatality occasionally, then a simple method is justified.
    2. Given the needs of most employers, the method which follows is felt to be suitable for most situations, although others may be preferred by some users. The method incorporates a judgement as to whether or not a risk is acceptable.
      1. For each hazard identified for each activity/situation, ask the question ‘what if?’. Realistically what is the worst likely outcome? Is it:
      2. A fatality?
      3. Major injury/permanent disability including permanent ill health?
      4. A minor injury?
      5. Environmental / plant damage?
    3. Two important laws of human nature should always be taken into account. First, never rely solely on common sense as it is much less common than is generally assumed. Secondly, always rely on sod’s law, “if someone can do it, sooner or later someone will”.
    4. Next, make a judgement of the probability or likelihood of harm occurring.
      Probability / likelihood Description
      Likely / forseeable Occurs repeatedly / event only to be expected.
      Probable Not surprised. Will occur several times. Could occur sometimes.
      Possible Unlikely, though conceivable.
      Remote / Improbable So unlikely that probability is close to zero.
    5. If the judgement is ‘improbable’ this needs to be subject to particularly rigorous scrutiny as, in reality, it is a relatively rare situation.
    6. Decisions as to whether or not action is needed can then be made by reference to the following matrix. This should be done assuming that any existing controls will fail. The question of adequacy of existing controls comes in a later section of this document.
        Likely Probable Possible Remote Improbable
      Fatal 1st 2nd 2nd 3rd  
      Major injury/ permanent disability 2nd 2nd 3rd    
      Minor injury 3rd 3rd      
      No injury          
    7. KEY:
        1st rank actions*
        2nd rank actions
        3rd rank actions
        acceptable risk - no action**
      *need to consider whether this constitutes ‘serious and imminent danger’ and therefore whether a procedure for withdrawal etc., is needed.
      **the matrix given above represents a minimum standard. Some users may wish to reflect higher standards in their organisation by extending the appropriate type of shading and hence priorities for action.
    8. Within each rank a method of deciding priorities can be made. Items from the first rank would be prioritised first, followed by those from the second rank and then those from the third rank. Bringing together a risk of injury and likelihood such that an unshaded area is reached means that the risk is acceptable, further assessment on this hazard is needed, but no action need be taken to control the risk arising from it. Such an outcome would arise when considering a hazard which, at worst, would produce a minor injury, which ‘could occur sometime’.
  10. Risk / Hazard Control: This selection and implementation of the most appropriate method of risk or hazard control is a crucial part of health and safety input. It is this which largely determines the success or failure of the effort to reduce the risk of injury or ill health to persons affected by work activities. However, failure of effort can also arise either if all the hazards have not been identified or if an incorrect judgement of probability/likelihood has been made.
    1. The most common cause of failure is where reliance for hazard information is based exclusively on accident statistics. Actually observing the activity etc., under consideration is also likely to give a more accurate Risk Assessment than treating it as a desk top exercise. The latter approach can give a false sense of security as well, because what it says in the safety manual may not be what happens in practice.
    2. Where there is more than one control option available for a similar degree of control of risk, then due account needs to be taken of the most cost effective option.
    3. A crucial consideration is the order of rank priority for risk (or hazard) control. In the following list, item 1 is the most effective method and item 10 the least effective. Where people are involved, their level of competence needs to be taken into account. In some work, e.g., electrical work, it could be a limiting factor.
      1. Elimination (e.g., buying ready sawn timber rather than using a circular saw);
      2. Substitution by something less hazardous and risky;
      3. Enclosure (enclose it in a way that eliminates or controls the hazard/risk);
      4. Guarding/segregation of people;
      5. Safe system of work that reduces the risk to an acceptable level;
      6. Written procedures that are known and understood by those affected;
      7. Adequate supervision;
      8. Identification of training needs;
      9. Information/instruction (signs, handouts);
      10. Personal protective equipment.
    4. In many cases a suitable combination of control methods may be necessary.
    5. As well as the above list being in rank order of effectiveness, it is worth bearing in mind that the amount of Management / Site Manager effort needed to maintain the controls is in inverse rank order. In other words, item 10 takes the most effort to maintain and item 1 the least effort.
    6. It may be found that there is more than one control measure or combination of measures which could be used. The most risk and cost effective one should be chosen, using informal or formal cost benefit analysis (should that be helpful). An essential part of the assessment is to look at the existing controls (if any) and judge whether or not they are adequate and to record this. It is not necessary to record all the details of existing controls if they can be dealt with by reference to other documents (for example, reference to a lock-off procedure could be dealt with by putting “see Safety Manual Section G pages 10-14”, rather than by reproducing the whole procedure). Similarly, reference can be made to other assessments where they are relevant. Examples of this reference to existing COSHH or Noise Assessments where those are suitable and sufficient.
    7. A further crucial aspect is to bear in mind what is the best practice for controlling the risk or hazard which is under consideration. This means that one needs to be aware of relevant practice in other employment sectors. This can best be done by reference to HSE Guidance Notes, the publications of Industry Advisory Committees, trade press, suppliers manuals etc.
  11. Recording the Assessment: The assessment must be recorded (electronic methods are acceptable) where more than five persons are employed, even if these employees are spread across a number of locations. All the significant findings are required to be included.
    1. Fundamentally this record should be activity/situation based. The overall objective is to improve controls and monitor these to ensure they continue to be applied.
    2. Appendix 1 contains one type of record sheet, but other methods are equally acceptable provided that they cover the points listed below. It should also be noted that other UK legislation transposing other EC Directives also requires recorded assessments. Reference is made to these later.
    3. In order to produce a suitable and sufficient assessment the following points must be recorded:-
      1. The activity / situation;
      2. The number of persons at risk;
      3. Any group of persons especially at risk (e.g., especially vulnerable employees such as disabled or lone workers, young persons, visitors, members of the public, contractors);
      4. Any serious and imminent risk (in which case written procedures are required and one or more competent persons appointed to carry out the procedure);
      5. Probability of harm occurring and the realistic worst case outcome (e.g., fatality, major injury, minor injury, no injury, environmental, plant damage);
      6. Relevant health and safety information needed by employees / others (as a minimum this would mean reviewing the provision of safety signs and audible / visual warnings);
      7. Any additional training needs;
      8. Reference to existing controls and whether or not these are satisfactory (existing controls need not be reproduced in full where they are documented elsewhere. Referring to these other documents as appropriate is sufficient);
      9. Action required in order of priority with proposed timescale and who is responsible for action.
  12. Other Assessments: UK Regulations bringing into effect other EC Directives will require other assessments, some of which are capable of being integrated into the Risk Assessment, others of which are best dealt with as separate issues.
    1. Those capable of being integrated into the Risk Assessment are:-
      1. Assessment of all factors relevant to safe working, e.g., lighting, ventilation etc., and the development of a preventive maintenance scheme including electrical system maintenance;
      2. Assessments under Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regs (HSE Guidance paras 110-120);
      3. Assessment of need/provision of personal protective equipment including the level of risk and an estimate of the performance requirement for the personal protective equipment.
    2. Assessments which are best dealt with as separate issues are:-
      1. Manual handling;
      2. Display screen equipment/workstation;
      3. Fire precautions/fire risk.
    3. Although the above three assessments are best dealt with as separate issues, nonetheless the general approach of this document may be found useful.
  13. Generic Assessments: Generic assessments are assessments produced once only for a given activity or type of workplace. For example, where a company has several locations where the same activity is carried out, then a single generic assessment could be done for that activity to cover all the locations. Similarly, if a company has employees who work away from base, such as electricians, then generic assessments can be used for their hazardous work, rather than attempting to produce an assessment for each activity at each location.
    Be warned, generic assessments can result in very poor control and no improvement in safety unless certain features are included. Worst case situations should be considered (e.g., if an activity is normally carried out at ground level but could require work above ground level at one or more locations with no permanent place of work, then this situation should be included in the generic assessment); Provision should be made on the assessment to monitor implementation of the assessment controls, which are/are not relevant at a particular location and what action needs to be done to fully implement the relevant required actions from the assessment. Particular care is needed to add any hazards or risks apparent at a particular situation where these are not included in the generic assessment.
  14. Health Surveillance: Risk Assessments need to identify where health surveillance is appropriate. This will arise where there is an identifiable disease or health condition related to the work, where there is a valid technique for its identification, where there is a likelihood that the disease or condition may occur as a result of the work and where the surveillance will improve the protection of health of the workers, (e.g., work related upper limb disorder, vibration white finger).
  15. Maintenance and Effectiveness of Assessments / Controls: The Regulations require Risk Assessments not only to be suitable and sufficient, but also to be maintained to ensure that they remain valid. This means that they must be kept under review and updated periodically.
    1. This is best achieved by a suitable combination of inspection and monitoring techniques, taking corrective/additional action where the need is identified. The process of monitoring, review and corrective action for Risk Assessments is given in Appendix 3. The techniques which need to be included in this process are listed below. Two common omissions which cause this effort not to be as successful as it deserves to be, are a lack of an effective safety audit and a lack of an effective system to ensure that defects/actions really are actioned and that they remain ‘flagged’ until they are actioned.
      1. Preventative maintenance inspections;
      2. Safety representative/committee inspections;
      3. Statutory and maintenance scheme inspections, tests and examinations;
      4. Safety tours and inspections;
      5. Occupational health surveys/measurements;
      6. Safety audits.
    2. Useful information on checking performance against own control standards can also be obtained reactively from the following activities:
      1. Accident and ill health investigation;
      2. Investigation of damage to plant;
      3. Incidents which did not cause these events but could have had serious consequences.
    3. An excellent and practical publication which addresses these and other aspects of relevance to this guidance is contained in ‘Successful Health and Safety Management’ produced by the HSE Accident Prevention Advisory Unit (available from HMSO. ISBN No. 0 11 885988 9).
  16. Timescale for Risk Assessments: The HSE expects companies to be able to demonstrate a clear commitment to carrying out risk assessments in a suitable and efficient manner.
    1. A good way to demonstrate this is to have a realistic timetable for carrying them out (perhaps as part of an annual safety plan) with a start having been made and with existing controls reviewed plus evidence of the use of a prioritised programme of improving controls where this is shown to be necessary by the Risk Assessment.
    2. One method for deciding on priorities is given in Appendix 4.

Appendix 3

Appendix 4 - Hazards

The following list gives the hazards which may need to be considered when carrying out Risk Assessments. It is not necessarily a comprehensive list, but is given to illustrate the extensive nature of the hazards which may need to be taken into account:

  • Fall of persons from height;
  • Fall of object/material from height;
  • Fall of person on same level;
  • Manual handling;
  • Use of machines;
  • Operation of vehicles;
  • Fire, including static electricity;
  • Electricity;
  • Drowning;
  • Excavation work;
  • Stored energy;
  • Explosions (Chemicals/dust);
  • Contact with cold/hot surfaces;
  • Compressed air;
  • Mechanical lifting operations;
  • Noise;
  • Biological agents;
  • Ionising radiation;
  • Non-Ionising radiation;
  • Vibration;
  • Hand tools;
  • Adverse weather;
  • Chemicals/substances;
  • Stacking;
  • Housekeeping;
  • Lighting;
  • Confined spaces;
  • Cleaning;
  • Bomb alert & emergency evacuation.
Site Safety Induction Guidance Brith Services Limited
General note: No persons are allowed to work on the Company work sites until they have received Site Safety Induction by Brith Services Limited Managers. A record should be kept of all persons who have received Induction. Induction to include the following:-
Company Health and Safety Policy:
Remind personnel of the Policy and its contents;
Inform personnel where a copy of the Policy is displayed on site.
Clients Health and Safety Policy:
Where appropriate, inform personnel of the Client’s safety requirements.
Site Management Structure:
Outline Line Management for the site.
Welfare and First Aid facilities:
Inform personnel where canteen and toilet facilities are located;
Ask personnel if they have any health issues that the Company should be aware of, or which may affect their work or their interaction with others;
Ensure personnel complete a Health Questionnaire if they have any health issues;
Inform personnel where the First Aid facilities are located;
Inform personnel who are the site’s First Aiders and appointed persons;
Remind personnel about good hygiene practices.
Personal Protective Equipment:
Standard requirement to wear safety footwear and Safety helmets where there is a risk of head injury;
PPE to be worn when using potentially hazardous substances;
PPE to be worn related to other risk factors and conditions.
Emergency Evacuation Procedures:
Outline the important factors of the Fire Plan for the site, in particular:-
The fire alarm, how it sounds and how to raise the alarm;
Fire escapes;
Fire fighting equipment;
Fire Wardens;
Fire prevention.
General Site Safety Rules:
Outline any agreed site safety rules to site personnel;
Risk Assessment:
Outline Risk Assessments to the workforce where necessary.
Method Statements:
Ensure that site personnel understand Method Statements for their work.
Other Safety Information:
Ensure that site personnel are provided with drawings, Manufacturers Safety Data, etc., where necessary.
Explain current and imminent works in progress, including any specific hazards and control measures, with particular emphasis on refurbishment and redevelopment sites which are known to have asbestos, or where asbestos could be present. Ensure site personnel understand they should only use plant and equipment which they have been properly instructed on.
Phasing and Scheduling of the works:
Ensure that all site personnel understand the importance of the scheduling of works in relation to the safety of themselves and others who may be working in their working environment.
General Safety Precautions and Site Rules:
All site operatives will sign in and out of the site with security or make their presence known on site to Management.
Safety footwear and safety helmets will be worn at all times.
General public safety will be maintained at all times.
Use the right tools for the job.
Plant and equipment to be kept in good order and not misused.
Report any safety defects to Site Management.
No smoking, no naked flames in areas at risk from fire and explosions.
Check the working environment for hazards before working.
Ensure instructions are fully understood before working.
Maintain personal hygiene.
Be aware of others safety - do not create hazards.
Always take precautions to prevent materials and tools etc., from falling.
Ensure that debris does not accumulate unsafely.
Do not obstruct accessways unsafely.
Do not carry loads that cannot be managed comfortably to prevent the risk of injury.
Report all accidents, dangerous occurrences or near misses immediately to the Foreman.
On refurbishment or redevelopment sites be aware that asbestos could be present and report suspect materials to Site Management immediately.
Environmental Safety Awareness:
Contamination of the building, building materials or ground, etc., pigeon guano, vermin foul, chemical pollution, etc. Environmental pollution, noise, dust, water courses, etc.
Site Waste Management Plan details.

Welding References

Legislation:
Electricity at Work Regulations 1989.
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2004.
Personal Protective Equipment Regulations 2002.
Control of Lead at Work Regulations 2002.
The Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000.

Approved Code of Practice:
Safety of transportable gas containers.

British Standards:
BS 341 Valve fittings for compressed gas cylinders.
BS 679 Filters for use during welding.
BS 1389 Hose connections for welding and cutting equipment.
BS 1542 Equipment for eye, face and neck protection during welding.
BS 1780 Pressure gauges.
BS 2653 Welders' protective clothing.
BS 5120 Rubber hose for gas welding.
BS 5741 Pressure regulators used in welding.
BS 6158 Safety devices for fuel gases and oxygen or compressed air for welding.
BS 6503 Welding torches.
Guidance:
Health and Safety Guidance Booklets:
HS(G)5 Hot Work.
HSE Guidance Notes:
CS4 The keeping of LPG in cylinders and similar containers.
CS6 The storage and use of LPG on construction sites.
MS15 Welding.
PM 64 Electrical Safety in Arc Welding.
British Compressed Gases Association Codes of Practice:
CP1 Safe working, maintenance and repair of regulators.
CP2 Safe working, maintenance and repair of blowpipes.
CP7 Safe use of oxy-fuel gas equipment.

Health and Safety in Welding and Allied Processes (The Welding Institute).

Provision & Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 - Notes

  1. Introduction: The Report of Inspection has been formulated to record the information required for Inspections carried out under The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER).
  2. Inspection Requirements: PUWER 98 introduces a new requirement to carry out Inspections of work equipment. An Inspection is required for work equipment when it has been installed or assembled in a new location to ensure that it has been installed correctly and is safe to operate, an assessment must be made of all other work equipment to determine if an inspection is needed and how often.
    1. The minimum Inspection regime should be set by the owner / supplier of the equipment based on Manufacturers information and other statutory obligations. Additional inspections will be identified by the user of the equipment. Factors that must be taken into account by the user include the work being carried out, any specific risks on site that may affect the condition of the equipment and the intensity of use of the equipment.
    2. An Inspection may include visual examination, a strip down of the equipment and functional tests. Advice should be sought from Manufacturers instructions and a competent person for guidance on what an Inspection should include for each piece of equipment.
  3. Responsibility for Inspection: A number of parties will have responsibilities for ensuring the work equipment is safe to use and that it has been inspected in accordance with the Inspection regime. The Hire Company must ensure that equipment they hire out complies with PUWER 98. The employer or self-employed person has a duty to ensure that equipment they use or provide for use complies with PUWER 98 and that includes ensuring that Inspections are carried out by a competent person. If you use equipment provided by another Contractor you have the duty to ensure the equipment is safe to use.
    1. If the equipment is provided on site for common use, i.e., a compressor or abrasive wheel, you must establish who will take responsibility for the equipment and ensure it complies with PUWER 98. As an employer you must still establish that it is safe for use by your employees.
    2. If you are using hired equipment you must agree with the Hire Company who will carry out the Inspections and when they will be carried out.
  4. TypesofInspection:
    1. Visual Check: Low risk equipment used for low risk activities will not always require a formal Inspection. A visual check may be required by the user before each use to ensure it is in good condition, e.g., a hammer should be checked to ensure that the head is not loose, a ladder should be checked for split stiles, broken rungs and other defects. The person carrying out these checks must be competent. There is no need to record the results of the visual check by Operatives.
    2. In circumstances where additional hazards exist, low risk equipment may need a more detailed check, e.g., a screwdriver used for work on a live electric supply or a torch that is taken into a confined space.
    3. Equipment that is of a higher risk and equipment with moving parts should have a visual check of the equipment before each use and may require a more formal check at specified intervals, e.g., 5/3 1⁄2 mixer or petrol driven disc cutter. A competent person should ascertain how often these formal checks should take place.
  5. Inspection: Equipment that poses a significant risk, i.e., dumpers, ride on rollers, etc., will need to be considered by a person competent to determine a suitable Inspection regime. These Inspections are in addition to the daily checks by the Operator and must be carried out by a competent person. For the majority of equipment, the formal Inspection will be undertaken weekly. Some equipment will require more frequent Inspections, e.g., equipment used in confined spaces may require an Inspection before each shift.
  6. Records of Inspection: Records of Inspections must be made and you are required to keep a record of the last Inspection. These records can be contained in a Register, attached to the equipment itself, or stored electronically in a tamper-proof form. They must be easily accessible by those who use the equipment or otherwise need information.
    1. If you use the equipment acquired from another user and it is subject to an Inspection regime, you must ensure that it is accompanied by physical evidence of the last Inspection. If you provide equipment for use by another user you must also ensure that the equipment is accompanied by physical evidence of the last Inspection.
    2. It is good practice to keep all records of Inspection and maintenance as they may be of use in the future.

Working Time Directive – Explanation of Regulations

  1. These Regulations are part of the Health and Safety Legislation and the HSE has the power to prosecute for breaches. Employees may enforce their rights to paid leave and rest in the Employment Tribunal.
  2. There are different requirements for “adult workers” who have attained the age of 18 and “young workers”, who have attained the age of 15, but not 18. This guidance deals solely with how these Regulations affect adult workers.
  3. Employees are restricted to an average maximum working time of 48 hours in any 7 days, including overtime, unless they have signed an agreement to the contrary. This agreement may be for a fixed period or last indefinitely. It may be cancelled by the worker at any time by giving a minimum of 7 day’s notice. The reference period for calculating the average weekly working time will normally be 17 weeks.
  4. Night workers are defined as persons whose normal hours of work include 3 or more hours between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. They must not on average work more than 8 hours in any 24 hours over a 17 week reference period. This restriction only applies to normal working hours and so excludes overtime.. If the work involves special hazards or heavy physical or mental strain posing a significant risk to health and safety, workers must not exceed 8 hours of night working in any 24 hour period. Employees are entitled (but need not accept) free confidential health checks before commencing night work, and then at regular intervals with a suggested minimum frequency of 12 months.
  5. Rest breaks of 20 minutes uninterrupted, away from any work station are an entitlement where employees are at work for more than 6 hours. Workers are entitled to an uninterrupted rest period of 11 hours each day and one of 24 hours in each 7 day period. The employer may decide to provide the employees with two rest periods of 24 hours per 14 day period or one rest period of 48 hours in the same period of time.
  6. Paid annual leave is an entitlement of workers who have 13 weeks continuous service. The entitlement will be 4 weeks annual paid leave.
  7. Workers involved in security activities are one of a number of special cases to which the Regulations on night working, rest breaks and rest periods do not apply.
  8. Adequate records must be kept by employers for 2 years showing that the requirements of a 48 hour week, night work and regular health assessments have been met. These records must be made available for inspection by any HSE or other authority appointed Inspector upon request. As regards the 17 week reference period employed to calculate average working times and nightwork, an adjustment must be made for holidays and sickness periods etc. taken in the reference period, by including in the calculation an equal period of days from the beginning of the next reference period.
I, (name in full), have read the above notice and:
(1) Wish / do not wish to work in excess of the government’s maximum working hours of forty-eight hours per week. I understand that I may cancel this agreement at any time by giving Brith Services Limited one week’s notice in writing;
(2) If I work at night I understand that I am required to complete a Health Questionnaire and failure to do so may result in termination of my engagement with the Company. I also understand that I am entitled to (but need not accept) a free confidential health check and the results of the Questionnaire may be verified by a medical examination at the Company’s expense.
Signed:........................................(employee) Date:..............................
Signed:........................................(For & on behalf of Employer) Date:..............................

Project Lifting Plan

Note: On a contract lift, the nominated Contractor responsible for the lift should prepare and submit their own specific Lifting Plan.

Guidelines

The purpose of this document is to provide a standard working document for Brith Services Limited’s Management Team to utilise for lifting operations. This document can be found in Part 3 of the Company’s Health & Safety Policy. As guidance, refer to Part 2 of the Policy, Lifting Operations.
Once this document has been completed to the satisfaction of the Management Team and the Appointed Person, the Company’s Safety Advisors, Richardson-Hill, must be requested to review and if satisfactory, sign-off prior to the lift taking place.
All lifting operations (whether direct or a contract lift) must be supervised by an Appointed Person (AP) and there must always be a competent member of the Company’s Project Team present at all times during lifting operations.

References

Health & Safety Policy / Safety Management System
Refer to Part 2, Lifting Operations section and the Semi-Generic Risk Assessment and
Safety Controls contained in Part 3, where applicable.

Legislation
Lifting Operations & Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998
Provision & Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998
The Work at Height (Amendment) Regulations 2007

British Standards
BS 327 Power driven derrick cranes
BS 357 Power driven travelling jib cranes
BS 1397 Safety belts and harnesses
BS 1757 Power driven mobile cranes
BS 1761 Single bucket excavators
BS 2799 Power driven rail mounted tower cranes
BS 7121 Code of Practice for the safe load indicators
BS 7262 Specification for automatic safe load indicators
BS CP 3010 Safe use of cranes (partly superseded by BS 7121)
BS 5975 2008 Code of Practice for temporary works procedures and the permissible stress design of falsework
Guidance
HSE SIM
SIM 02/2010/04 The Management of temporary works in the construction industry
HSE Guidance Notes:
GS 39 Training of Crane Drivers and Slingers
PM 3 Erection and dismantling of tower cranes
PM 9 Access to tower cranes
PM 42 Excavators used as cranes
PM 43 Scotch derrick cranes
PM 46 Wedge and socket anchorage’s for wire ropes

HSE Report:
Management’s responsibilities in the safe operation of mobile cranes (ISBN 0 11 883301 4)

HSE Video:Automatic safe load indicators on mobile cranes (Central Film Library)

British Standards
Chain
Short link chain for lifting purposes BS 4942
Higher tensile steel Grade 40 BS 1663
Alloy steel Grade 60 BS 3113
Alloy steel Grade 80 BS 3114
Calibrated round steel link lifting chains BS 6521
 
Chain slings
Higher tensile steel BS 2902
Alloy steel BS 3458
Welded BS 6304
 
Eyebolts
Eyebolts for lifting purposes BS 4278
 
Hooks
Higher tensile steel hooks for chains, slings and general engineering purposes. BS 2903
 
Shackles
Higher tensile steel shackles BS 3032
Alloy steel shackles BS 3551
 
Ropes
Wire ropes for cranes, excavators and general engineering purposes BS 3032
Code of practice for the safe use of wire rope slings for general lifting purposes BS 6210
Small wire ropes BS 3530
Wire rope slings BS 1290
Ferrule secured eye termination’s for wire ropes BS 5281
Specification for ropes made from manilla, sisal, hemp, cotton and coir BS 2052
Man-made fibre ropes BS 4928
Code of practice for the selection, care and maintenance of steel wire ropes BS 6570
 
Slings
Wire coil flat slings BS 3481 (part 1)
Flat woven slings made of man-made fibre for general service BS 3481 (part 2)
Textile lifting slings BS 6668
Lifting slings BS 6166
 
Pulley blocks
Heavy duty pulley blocks for use with wire rope BS 4536
Pulley blocks for use with natural synthetic fibre ropes BS 4344
Pulley blocks for use with rope maximum lift 25 tons BS 4018
Hand operated chain pulley blocks BS 3243
 
Winches
Hand operated plate-sided winches BS 3701
 
Gin blocks BS 1692
HSE Guidance Notes
PM 16 Eyebolts
PM 20 Cable-laid slings and grommets
PM 39 Hydrogen embrittlement of grade ‘T’ chain
PM 54 Lifting gear standards

Fire Safety Plan

In accordance with The Regulatory (Fire Safety) Order 2005 & The CDM Regulations 2015

    Contents
  1. Organisation of Responsibility for Fire Safety
  2. Evaluation of Fire Risks Throughout the Stages of the Project
    1. Construction of timber frame buildings – additional measures
    2. Compartmentalisation
  3. Combustible Materials
    1. Controlling the quantity of combustible materials on the project
    2. Consider less flammable / combustible materials
    3. Storage of combustible and volatile materials / substances
    4. Minimising and managing rubbish which could fuel fires and obstruct access
    5. Volatile flammable materials – extra precautions
    6. Coverings and sheeting – flame retardant materials
    7. LPG storage arrangements
    8. Safeguarding existing services and fuel tanks etc.
  4. Ignition Sources
    1. Hot works procedures
    2. Plant and equipment selection
    3. Smoking precautions
    4. Electrical installations
    5. Bonfires
    6. Security preventing arson
  5. Existing Fire Precaution Arrangements
  6. Occupiers Arrangements
  7. Means of Escape
    1. Routes
    2. Alternatives
    3. Protection
    4. Assembly
    5. Signs
  8. Means of Giving Warning
  9. Means of Fighting Fire
    1. Existing fire-fighting arrangements
    2. Location and referencing of fire points
    3. Contents of fire points in relation to their referencing
  10. Fire Plan Layout Drawings and evacuation routes
  11. Drawings
  12. Fire Authority Conditions and Correspondence
  13. Fire Brigade Access
  14. Site Communications
  15. Procedures for Calling the Fire Brigade
  16. Action in the Event of a Fire
  17. References – Company Health & Safety Policy, Guidance & Working Documentation, such as Permits to Work and Forms Legislation, British Standards, HSE Information, etc.
  18. Appendices – for attached information such as relevant Surveys, Drawings, etc.

  1. Organisation of Responsibility for Fire Safety
    Name & Contact details Role Responsibilities
      Project Director Overall responsibility for site fire arrangements.
      Project Manager Responsible for ensuring that the Professional Team and Site Management Team implement and maintain all necessary fire arrangements.
      Site Manager To ensure that all fire arrangements are maintained and understood by all site personnel, including visitors and where necessary, neighbours.
      Site Foreman To ensure that their area of works fire arrangements are in order and to regularly remind the workforce under their control of the fire arrangements and site precautions. They are also to report any non-compliance to the Site Manager.
      Safety Advisor To assist all Project Personnel in formulating a Fire Plan and maintaining arrangements as the project progresses.
      Fire Co-ordinator To take control of an emergency event in relation to fire and to co-ordinate and communicate with the Appointed Fire Wardens and the workforce in general, providing Fire Safety Tool Box Talks.
      Fire Warden To carry out fire checks of their area, including fire-fighting equipment and alarm systems. To assist with evacuation procedures and to remind the workforce of precautionary measures and controls such as conforming to Hot Works Permits.
      Fire Warden
      Fire Warden
      Fire Warden
  2. Evaluation of Fire Risks throughout the Stages of the Project
    General Guidance: The project Fire Risk Assessment is likely to require a review on a regular basis, particularly when significant changes take place, i.e., from brick to timber construction, or when the building is being compartmentalised, or from activities which may affect fire escape routes, etc. The initial evaluation must be reviewed and changed where necessary to suit and accommodate programmed works and any previous potential fire hazards experienced, i.e., hot works problems and arson.
    1. Construction of timber frame buildings – additional measures
      General Guidance: If timber framed construction is to be employed on the project, additional fire precautionary measures must be included in detail in this section to show clearly what the additional issues are and how the hazards and potential risks will be eliminated where possible, or minimised.
    2. Compartmentalisation
      General Guidance: Explain design arrangements, prioritising the importance of compartmentalisation and explain how this is planned to be constructed and how this may affect any prior site arrangement, such as fire escape routes, fire points, fire signage, etc.
  3. Combustible Materials
    General Guidance: Minimise combustible materials hazards and risks. Consider alternative non- combustible materials with the Professional Team and other Contractors. Also consider maximum volumes, safe distance for storage, fire retardant covers and no smoking / no naked flame areas.
    1. Controlling the quantity of combustible materials on the project
      General Guidance: Minimise the quantity of combustible materials. Consider ‘just-in-time’ deliveries.
    2. Consider less flammable / combustible materials
      General Guidance: Review design spec details and advise and agree less flammable and combustible materials where possible.
    3. Storage of combustible and volatile materials / substances
      General Guidance: Specify the location of storage areas and the additional control measures which will minimise the hazards and risks.
    4. Minimising and managing rubbish which could fuel fires and obstruct access
      General Guidance: Title self-explanatory.
    5. Volatile flammable materials – extra precautions
      General Guidance: Title self-explanatory.
    6. LPG Storage arrangements
      General Guidance: Specify where the safest place for a gas compound is to be located on site and the safety precautions which will be taken.
    7. Safeguarding existing services and fuel tanks, etc.
      General Guidance: Detail the arrangements for checking existing services and fuel tanks and the precautionary measures which are required to minimise fire hazards and risks.
  4. Ignition Sources
    General Guidance: Identify all the potential ignition sources involved in the project. Also consider potential nearby ignition sources at the boundary of the site and include additional precautionary measures and controls which will be implemented.
    1. Hot Works Procedures
      General Guidance: Identify all hot works involved in the project and ensure there are suitable hot works procedures in place, such as Hot Works Permits.
    2. Plant and Equipment Selection
      General Guidance: Where there are medium to high hazards and risks regarding fires, detail the safeguards which will prevent plant and equipment being in ignition source.
    3. Smoking Precautions
      General Guidance: All enclosed spaces will be non-smoking areas. External areas which are a medium to high hazard / risk area for fires should also be non-smoking areas, such as excavations, manholes, gas compounds, flammable and combustible material storage areas, etc. Clearly indicate where smoking is permitted and what provisions are in place to discard cigarettes, cigars and pipes, etc., safely.
    4. Electrical Installations
      General Guidance: Detail the controls such as 17th Edition Code of Practice, competent qualified Electricians, design calculations, tests, inspections and certifications. Refer to Construction Low Voltage Electrical Equipment and Lighting and how 240v installations for canteens and other supplies to parts of the building not being worked on will be protected.
    5. Bonfires
      General Guidance: Specify whether bonfires are permissible with the Local Authority – if they are, specify where the designated location will be and what controls will be in place with regard to the size of fires permissible and fire-fighting equipment.
    6. Security Preventing Arson
      General Guidance: Specify the protection of the buildings and the perimeter.
  5. Existing Fire Precaution Arrangements
    General Guidance: Review all existing arrangements such as Fire Plans, detection systems and alarms, etc.
  6. Occupiers Arrangements
    General Guidance: Review all arrangements which must be accommodated and specify arrangements.
  7. Means of Escape
    General Guidance: Specify means of escape and how often, in accordance with the programme, a review will take place to ensure adequate escape in the event of a fire.
    1. Routes
      General Guidance: Produce the initial Fire Plan Drawing for each floor level, indicating fire points, alarms and signage, fire escape doors and lighting.
    2. Alternatives
      General Guidance: Detail any alternative arrangements which will be beneficial or necessary. This could mean two or more alternative routes, etc.
    3. Protection
      General Guidance: Temporary or planned early installation of fire retardant materials, compartmentalisation, fire doors, non-combustibles in escape routes, etc.
    4. Assembly
      General Guidance: Clearly identify where the emergency fire assembly point is located.
    5. Signs
      General Guidance: Specify the standard of signage which will be used and where it will be located. You may detail the Fire Plan drawing and refer to Section 9.1 if sufficiently detailed.
  8. Means of Giving Warning
    General Guidance: Consider and detail the most reliable and effective means of giving warning in the event of a fire to ensure that all persons on site are aware the alarm has been activated. In noisy working environments, this could mean more audible alarm devices, flashing red lights, emergency paging devices, etc.
  9. Means of Fighting Fire
    General Guidance: Specify the fire-fighting equipment at each fire point, i.e., types and sizes of fire extinguishers, fire blankets, hoses, sprinkler systems, etc.
    1. Existing Fire-Fighting Arrangements
      General Guidance: Detail whether existing fire-fighting arrangements can be used, whether they are suitable, whether the existing fire-fighting arrangements will be taken out of service during the works and arrangements for ensuring that temporary arrangements are in place prior to taking existing arrangements out of service.
    2. Location and Referencing of Fire Points
      General Guidance: On small straightforward projects, the location and referencing of fire points can be indicated on the Fire Plan Drawing, reference Section 9.1. On larger projects, a separate listing may be beneficial.
    3. Contents of Fire Points in relation to their referencing
      General Guidance: Title self-explanatory.
  10. Fire Plan Layout Drawings and Evacuation Routes
    General Guidance: Refer to Section 9.1 and detail where Fire Plan Drawings will be displayed, including alterations to suit where a person might be in relation to the displayed Fire Plan Drawing.
  11. Drawings
    General Guidance: Provide a Drawing Register, which should include Fire Plan Drawings and other drawings which provide information relevant to hazards, risks and controls, etc.
  12. Fire Authority Conditions and Correspondence
    General Guidance: Title self-explanatory.
  13. Fire Brigade Access
    General Guidance: Detail the arrangements and provide dimensions.
  14. Site Communications
    General Guidance: Detail arrangements for communications Site Management, the Fire Co-ordinator, Fire Wardens and the Emergency Services.
  15. Procedures for Calling the Fire Brigade
    General Guidance: Title self-explanatory.
  16. Action in the Event of a Fire
    General Guidance: General arrangements are contained in the Company Health & Safety Policy, Part 2, which can be referred to. These arrangements should be made specific to the site.
  17. References

    Company Health & Safety Policy:

    Part 1
    Responsibilities:

    Managers Section 4.2, Paragraph 8;
    Health & Safety Advisors Section 4.7, Paragraph 1.

    Part 2
    Procedures:

    Fire Precautions;
    Company Fire Policy;
    Site Planning & Layout.

    Part 3
    Working Documentation:

    Information Signs for Action to be taken in the event of a major or small fire;
    Fire Risk Assessment – Blank Pro-forma.

    Permits to Work:
    Abrasive Wheels;
    Electric Arc Welding;
    Electrical Permit to Work;
    Gas Welding and Cutting;

    Forms / Plans:
    Emergency Lighting Test Record Form;
    Fire Drill Register;
    Fire Instruction Training / Induction Register;
    Escape Routes Check Record Form
    Fire Alarm System Test Record Form;
    Fire Doors Check Record Form;
    Fire Fighting Equipment Inspection Record Form;

    Mandatory Forms & Reports:
    Premises Fire Safety Assessment.

    Legislation
    The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005
    Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999
    Dangerous Substances & Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002
    Petroleum Consolidation Act 1928
    Petroleum Spirit (Plastic Containers) Regulations 1982
    Health & Safety (Safety Signs & Signals) Regulations 1996
    Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015

    British Standards
    BS 476 Fire tests on building materials and structures
    BS 1945 Specification for fireguards for heating appliances
    BS 5266 Part 1, (amended 1998) Emergency lighting of premises
    BS 5306 Part 1 Hydrant systems, hose reels and foam inlets
    BS 5306 Part 3 Code of practice for selection, installation and maintenance of portable fire extinguishers
    BS 5499 Part 1 (amended 1993) Fire safety signs
    BS 5588 Fire precautions in the design, construction and use of buildings
    BS 5839 Part 1 (amended 1996) Fire detection and alarm systems
    BS 6778 Specification for fireguards for use with portable, free-standing or wall-mounted heating appliances
    BS 7863 Colour coding to indicate the extinguishing medium in portable fire extinguishers
    BS 7944 Specification for fire blankets
    BS 8214 (amended 1992) Fire door assemblies
    HSE Booklets
    HS (G) 51 Storage of flammable liquids in containers
    HS (G) 168 Fire Safety in construction work
    Fire Safety an employer’s guide ISBN 0-11-341229-0
    HSE Guidance Notes
    CS 15 Cleaning and gas freeing of tanks containing flammable residues
    HSE Leaflets
    ND (G) 227 Safe working with flammable substances
    HSE 8 Take care with oxygen
    CIS 51 Construction fire safety

    Other guidance
    Fire Prevention on Construction Sites: Joint Code of Practice on the Protection from Fire of Construction
    Sites and Buildings Undergoing Renovation (CC, LPC) (5th Ed. January 2000)
    Standard Fire Precautions for Contractors Engaged on Crown Works (HMSO ISBN 0 11 753094 8)

    Wood Information Sheet
    4-30 Fire performance of timber frame dwellings
    http://www.trada.co.uk/bookshop/view/1D283468-3E29- 44E6-B2EA-190CC2DED833/Fire_performance_of_timber_frame_dwellings

    Construction Briefing
    HSG 168 Fire Safety on Construction Sites
    http://www.trada.co.uk/downloads/constructionBriefings/ HSG%20168%20Fire%20Safety%20on%20Construction%20 Sites%20V2.pdf
    UKTFA guidance on fire safety on construction sites http://www.uktfa.com/download-documents/

    Chief Fire Officers’ Association (CFOA) website: www.cfoa.org.uk

  18. Appendices

Premises Fire Safety Assessment

All premises that do not have a current fire certificate must comply with The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005.

Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, employers are required to have regard for fire safety in the workplace. The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 reinforce that requirement by imposing a duty to specifically assess fire risks at premises, consider the effectiveness of any existing measures to control those risks and then make any improvements that are found to be necessary.

The assessment should include the physical fire safety measures employed, such as the adequacy of fire / smoke stop doors, fire exit doors, fire-fighting equipment etc., and that of active fire safety measures, such as fire warning systems, escape lighting, automatic fire detection systems, automatic fire-fighting equipment etc.

Smoke detectors provide the most effective early warning of outbreak of fire. They promptly alert occupiers to the early stages of a fire, while conditions allow for a safe escape. Most smoke detectors are of the ionising type and are particularly suitable at detecting hot blazing fires. The other type of detector i.e. the photoelectric, tend to be more sensitive to smoke from smouldering fires. Smoke detectors must not be treated as a substitute for taking precautions against fire.

Escape lighting provides sufficient illumination to allow persons to evacuate premises safely in the event of a power failure in a building used outside daylight hours, or in parts of the building, such as basements, where there is no natural light. This can easily happen in a fire if there is damage to the electrical installation. Escape lighting may consist of trickle charged, battery operated lights which switch on automatically if the mains power fails. Alternatively, or in addition, photoluminescent tapes, discs and arrows may be used.

Procedural systems, Fire Evacuation Plans, Fire Safety Audits and the provision of fire safety training will also form part of the assessment and satisfactory arrangements must be formulated, implemented and monitored by the employer.

If yours is a shared workplace (with other organisations) you will need to check that they know about any significant risks you have identified and what you have done about them. The reverse is also required and any co- occupiers must keep you informed of their risk assessments.

Where you do not have direct control over places or equipment in the workplace which the staff will use in the course of their work, then the person who does have control has a responsibility to make sure that these areas or items comply with the requirements of the Regulations.

There are no set, hard and fast rules on how the assessment must be carried out, but as with other types of risk assessment it must be effective and recorded. Most importantly, it should be both practical and systematic and consist of the following stages:

Stage 1 - Identify any fire hazards, i.e., anything that could cause an outbreak of fire, such as the presence of any readily combustible materials or highly flammable liquids in locations where there are sources of heat or where circumstances allow there to be malicious ignition.

Stage 2 - Identify the persons who are at risk, especially those who would be more vulnerable in the event of there being an outbreak of fire, such as the disabled or those with certain medical conditions.

Stage 3 - Consider the existing fire safety measures and assess their adequacy.

Stage 4 - Consider the findings of stages 1 to 3 and determine what else needs to be done to eliminate the detected fire hazards or reduce any associated risk of an outbreak of fire and/or an outbreak of fire leading to injury, damage and other loss.

Stage 5 - Record the findings of the risk assessment and implement any identified new control measures.

Stage 6 - Prepare an emergency plan for the premises or update the existing plan.

Stage 7 - Check that all necessary arrangements are in place to allow the emergency plan to operate effectively. Provide premises occupiers with sufficient information, instruction and training on fire safety awareness, fire precautions and hold fire drills regularly to practice the arrangements.

Stage 8 - Monitor the arrangements and periodically review the Risk Assessment or when there are changes to circumstances at the premises, such as building remodelling or changes to the activities at the site which could make the assessment invalid.

A competent person must carry out the Risk Assessment, who must be appointed by the employer in compliance with the Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations. Anyone who delegated responsibility for performing this risk assessment, in order to be deemed acceptably competent must be temperamentally suitable, be appropriately qualified and experienced, and have been provided with specific training on the task involved.

They should use the Premises Fire Safety Assessment Checklist to assist them to address all significant factors at their premises.